ARTICLES

5 Cycling Tours for Foodies

Furthermore from Equinox, April 2017

A round-up of culinary cycling tours, where you burn off what you eat, each day on a bike. (Furthermore from Equinox, April 2017)

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The Glutton’s Guide to Adventure

Tasting Table, April 2017

A round-up of six of the world’s best active culinary vacations. (Tasting Table, April 2017)

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The Air France Fiasco

BootnsAll.com, December 2002

Nothing makes you crazed at the beginning of a trip to Europe than having the airline loose your luggage.

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ENTRIES FROM THE GLOBAL TRIP BLOG CHRONICLES

Three Flavors of Alps

From the trip blog: "The Global Trip 2004: Sixteen Months Around The World"
Posted July 22, 2004

DAY 273:  The sun came up over the Rhône as I waited for an early morning taxi on the riverbank.  I was the only one awake in probably all of the Ile de la Barthelasse at 6:30, other than security guards or groundskeepers.  I was the only one on the island trying to get an early train out of Avignon to move onto another destination.

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Memories of Tuscany

From the trip blog: "The Global Trip 2004: Sixteen Months Around The World"
Posted July 25, 2004

DAY 274: Firenze, more commonly known in the English-speaking world as Florence, lies in the scenic hills in Tuscany, the northwestern province of Italy.  Florence has attracted many people for centuries, particularly in the 14th and 15th (A.D.), when it became the center point of the Renaissance, a place where the masters of thought, astronomy, literature, art and architecture came to be.  Nowadays, the city of 376,000 residents attracts tourists from all over the world, each bringing home his/her own personal memory of Tuscany.

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Mr. Big Head

From the trip blog: "The Global Trip 2004: Sixteen Months Around The World"
Posted July 25, 2004

DAY 275:  Florence holds one of the world’s most famous sculptures, Michelangelo’s David, which one art critic hailed, “Nor has there ever been seen a pose so fluent, or a gracefulness equal to this, or feet, hands and head so well related to each other with quality, skill and design.”  I don’t know what that guy was talking about; all I focused on was how disproportionately big Dave’s head was.

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When Harry Met Erik…

From the trip blog: "The Global Trip: Two in the Boot and Beyond"
Posted July 04, 2007

PART 1:  Ah, Venice.  Arguably the most romantic city in the world with its winding alleys, endless canals and wandering gondolas, it couldn’t have been a better locale to start a romantic getaway for a couple of “jetsetters.”  Steph and I had decided to use Venice as our rendezvous point as it’s common ground; we’d both been there before already and it was a small enough city to get around on foot — when you’re not lost of course, or trying to find each other.  Steph had arrived about an hour before me from Tuscany, only to wait for me at the jetty that I didn’t arrive at from the airport.  Meanwhile, I had arrived at a different jetty and had gone to our room in the eastern-influenced-but-classicaly-Venetian three-star Hotel Noemi, only to find it empty.  Our first hour in Venice was simply a game of text message phone tag:

Meet me here

Im walking there

Im here

Im walking over

Where are we meeting?

etc.

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Practice For The Amazing Race

From the trip blog: "The Global Trip: Two in the Boot and Beyond"
Posted July 05, 2007

PART 2:  “Have you seen The Amazing Race?” I asked Steph as we jogged with our packs on our backs to the ACTV water bus stop at Venice’s Rialto Bridge.  She wasn’t too familiar with it and I explained how it was the Emmy award-winning CBS reality show — called by some critics as the only reality show worth watching — in which eleven teams of two race around the world, following clues to markers and pitstops in faraway destinations.  Each pair has a different relationship dynamic (i.e. father/daughter, married gay guys, boyfriend/girlfriend, etc.) that the drama of travel can make or break.  In The Amazing Race, traveling in haste can really cause people to crack under pressure.

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The Fake Honeymooners

From the trip blog: "The Global Trip: Two in the Boot and Beyond"
Posted July 07, 2007

PART 3:  “Do you realize we’re going on what is most people’s honeymoons?” Steph said to me in Venice.  “A [romantic] romp through Europe.”

True, our mere summer romantic getaway was very honeymoon-esque, particularly at our next destination, the Isle of Capri, Italy’s resorty island off the coast of Naples, a place that my friend Alan (a.k.a. LovePenny) called the highlight of his honeymoon.  “I think Venice was his second highlight,” I told Steph.  “And we just came from there.”

Capri wasn’t originally on our itinerary until Steph’s mom told Steph that she loved Capri so much, she’d pay for our hotel if we decided to go there.

“I think we should go to Capri then,” I said, prompting our travels to southern Italy.

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The Most Swingingest Brothel In Pompeii

From the trip blog: "The Global Trip: Two in the Boot and Beyond"
Posted July 07, 2007

PART 4: The Isle of Capri was the last place that we’d set in stone in our pre-departure planning, and the unknown, spontaneous part of our trip was upon us.  “Can we go to Pompeii?” Steph asked me.

“I was actually going to ask you that.”  Pompeii, another place neither of us had visited before, was only a couple hours away by car — fortunately, we had one.

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No Particular Place To Go

From the trip blog: "The Global Trip: Two in the Boot and Beyond"
Posted July 09, 2007

PART 5: “Wouldn’t it be great if I just turned on the radio and that song came on, Riding along in my automobile….  duh nanana nah na nuh naah… No particular place to go…?” I said to Steph, humming that middle part of the Chuck Berry song.  It would have been the most appropriate song as we departed Pompeii and head south towards Sorrento and the Amalfi Coast.  However, without the song, we just settled on what we could get on Italian radio and the Harry Belafonte CD.

“Here’s the map,” Steph told me, navigating from the passenger side.  “We can go down this road that goes down the coast.  See, it goes, ‘pretty pretty pretty pretty…’” she continued, tracing the road with her finger.  “You have to say that when you drive along it.  It’s the Amalfi Coast song.”

“Okay.”

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The Mountain Town

From the trip blog: "The Global Trip: Two in the Boot and Beyond"
Posted July 09, 2007

PART 6:  When I was on the island of Naxos in Greece, I was sent on a quest by my friend and former boss Tracy to find a nostalgic, almost mythical place from his past:  a tiny hamlet where he’d spent many fun-filled and memorable summers in the company of friends and an old jovial man named Vasillis.  Steph also knew of an old man, her jovial friend Franco from Vermont, who had grown up in a little Italian mountain town near the geographic center of the country, high up in the Apennine mountain range.  And so, like I had done before her, Steph began a quest to find her curious, mythical town, a mere speck on our road map.

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In Limbo

From the trip blog: "The Global Trip: Two in the Boot and Beyond"
Posted July 10, 2007

PART 7:  “I’m really sorry we missed it,” Steph apologized as the only ferry to Croatia’s Hvar Island had already departed from Pescara, Italy.  We had arrived only ten minutes late for the once-a-day 10:30 a.m. ferry across the Adriatic — the next was twenty-three hours and fifty minutes away.  Up until we knew this, I wasn’t worried because I figured there was probably another ferry at some point leaving from Pescara, but I was wrong.

“It’s okay,” I told Stephanie, clueless as to how our day would turn out that morning.  “This’ll be one of those unexpected detours I wrote about on my blog.  It’ll be fun.”

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ABOUT ERIK R. TRINIDAD

When he’s not making a living as an interactive/motion designer or playing with fast food, Erik R. Trinidad is a travel writer, blogger, video host and producer focusing on adventure and culinary content. His work has been featured on National Geographic Intelligent Travel, Adventure.com, Discovery.com, Saveur, Condé Nast Traveler, and Hyenas Laughed at Me and Now I Know Why, which also includes the work of Tim Cahill, Doug Lansky, Jennifer Leo and Rolf Potts. He has also referenced his travel experiences in his solo book, Fancy Fast Food: Ironic Recipes with No Bun Intended.

For over ten years, Erik has traveled to the seven continents of the world — from Timbuktu to Kalamazoo — with a curiosity for exotic foods and a thirst for adventure (and writing material).  In his travels, he has been mugged at knifepoint in Cape Town, extorted by corrupt Russian police on the Trans-Siberian Railway, stranded in tornadic storms in the American midwest, and air-lifted off the Everest Trail by a helicopter that was thankfully paid for by his travel insurance.  But it hasn’t been all fun; he has also donned a tuxedo amidst the penguins of Antarctica, paraded with Carnival-winning samba school Beija Flor in Rio, run for his life at Pamplona’s “Running of the Bulls,” cage-dived with great white sharks, gotten shot point-blank in the stomach in Colombia (while wearing a bulletproof jacket), and above all, encountered many people around the world, including some Peruvian musicians in Cuzco who learned and played “Y.M.C.A.” at his request. He loves the irony that, after everywhere he’s been, he has never been to Mexico.

Erik writes stories and news articles when he’s at his base camp in New York City, and continues his blog when he is on the road — provided he’s not occupied tracking down lost luggage.

Additional news/article clippings at ErikTrinidad.com.



See Erik talk about travel in an American Express ad:



Read about Erik in this feature article from Filipinas magazine by National Geographic Traveler Associate Editor Amy Alipio.



The views and opinions written on The Global Trip blog are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the official views and opinions of the any affiliated publications.
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