A Penny Saved Is A Penny Earned…

pennies.jpg

This blog entry was originally posted on October 14, 2003.

...but 35 lbs. (15.876 kg) of pennies, is how much earned?

I’ve had this empty tin can from Danish Butter Cookies that I’ve filled with pennies over the years, whenever I’ve remembered to.  Realizing that I’m about to leave for a really long time, it’s about time I cash it all in and see how much it actually is. 

How much do YOU think it’s worth?

Post your guess as a comment.  The closest guess without going over (Price Is Right style) gets a postcard!






Next entry: I Broke The Bank And All I Got Was This Lousy T-shirt

Previous entry: Last Licks




Commenting is not available in this channel entry.

Comments for “A Penny Saved Is A Penny Earned...”

  • it’s 520 pennies!!!!  now give me my share of that!

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  06:28 PM


  • It’s worth :
    57 dollars, 75 cents

    Posted by Andrew  on  10/14  at  06:29 PM


  • now that I think about it….$15.76

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  06:30 PM


  • Boing!

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  06:32 PM


  • I’m going with $33.09

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  06:32 PM


  • guessing about 25 bucks.

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  06:36 PM


  • let’s try for $61.38

    just a postcard? How about a postcard and a shot (on Friday)... =P

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  06:38 PM


  • This sounds like a question which Microsoft would ask in its interview. So just let me pretend that I am being interviewed (the postcard, after all is a prize catch).

    The weight of a single penny depends on the year in which it was minted. Assuming that Erik has been collecting pennies for the last ten years, the avearge weight of a single penny would be 3.05 gms. (1000 gms = 1 kg). This would be 15,000 gms approximately divided by 3.05 which is 4918 worth in pennies. Now I dont know how to covert pennies into dollars so i leave it at this. Hey Erik, no more such questions, just interesting stories and lots of pics once you get going. PC and ANt reach Bangalore sooooooon.. waiting eagerly for them

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  06:38 PM


  • hmmm, $59.00, roughly.(minus the $2 for my postcard and stamp.)

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  06:40 PM


  • everyone knows that 10lbs of pennies = $10. Its science afterall. You can’t beat science…well, maybe with magic you can.

    $35!

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  06:40 PM


  • My guess - $47.28

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  06:45 PM


  • I think it’s about $55.15.  Are you going to use this for a couple of hostel stays?

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  06:50 PM


  • are we suppose to factor in the Coin Star surcharge?

    if so, my second “scientific” guess is $12.00.

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  06:52 PM


  • I will be using the “Penny Arcade” machine at Commerce Bank, which is free-of-charge and more accurate than CoinStar. 

    Something to consider:  a lot of the pennies are dirty as hell, so estimations by weight won’t really help.  Also, keep in mind that “35 lbs.” is an approximate weight, given by a bathroom scale (the one with the needle) bought at a mall.  (Nothing scientific or anything.)

    Posted by Erik  on  10/14  at  06:56 PM


  • 55 dollars 32 cents—see ya Friday. Hey - what do I win if I’m the closest?

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  06:58 PM


  • $55.35. I wonder how much the tin can affects calculations…

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  07:00 PM


  • The answer (to the Universe) is $42

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  07:04 PM


  • How much do I think it is worth?  Less than the effort it would be to lug 35 pounds of pennies somewhere to get cashed in.

    I look forward to my postcard.

    Posted by Matt  on  10/14  at  07:08 PM


  • $69

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  07:36 PM


  • well the guess by Dusty of 4918 seems good except he forgot to subtract the weight of the can smile  I will guess the can weighs 0.5 lbs.  and you have about 4847 pennies

    Posted by scott  on  10/14  at  08:39 PM


  • I’d say $17.50.

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/14  at  11:57 PM


  • $69.69…  whoever took $69 is a feg..

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/15  at  12:31 AM


  • 45.19

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/15  at  01:18 AM


  • My guess is that there are 7000 pennies

    Posted by Neven  on  10/15  at  01:22 AM


  • I’m in for $48.77

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/15  at  01:59 AM


  • Let’s go for $100 , that or $117.01

    I’m already gettin’ a post card so there!  Two post cards would be nice though.  C’mon Erik, think BIG!

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/15  at  01:59 AM


  • How big is that can?
    I can’t tell from the picture how full it is.
    Where’d you come up with 35 pounds?

    This is stupid.

    50 bucks.

    Posted by Koetke  on  10/15  at  02:04 AM


  • ? 36.80   - Can I have the tin when you get back form Commerce??

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/15  at  02:28 AM


  • 62.38

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/15  at  03:55 AM


  • Ah no, scott. The weight of the can was factored in, while rounding off. E when are you giving us the answer?

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/16  at  08:01 AM


  • $23.34

    Well arn’t you going to tell us how much you got? I know there’s no space in your pack for that tin!

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/23  at  09:21 AM


  • I aways open my big mouth before I keep reading!

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/23  at  09:25 AM


  • Hmmmm…let’s say $57.38
    Come on baby! Mamma wants a post card!!!

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/25  at  06:11 PM


  • Ahhh, now I get Tdots post hehe

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/25  at  06:17 PM


  • We guess $64.00.

    Taking into consideration the weight differential of tarnished coins versus newly minted and the average age (year) of U.S. pennies in circulation cross-referenced with known weight variances of certain batches produced within those years (taken from the U.S. Mint’s production database)...this is our humble guess (not considering the planetary gravitational pull on the geographical location, time and day you weighed the coins).

    Haha…just kidding. We just used a simple algorithm based on chaos theory and quantum mechanics to make our guess. Cheers.

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/25  at  09:20 PM


  • ur ugly lol dont take no more shits bitch

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  10/28  at  01:57 PM


back to top of page


SHARE THIS TRAVEL DISPATCH:


Follow The Global Trip on Twitter
Follow The Global Trip in Instagram
Become a TGT Fan on Facebook
Subscribe to the RSS Feed



This blog post is one of over 500 travel dispatches from the trip blog, "The Global Trip 2004: Sixteen Months Around The World (Or Until Money Runs Out, Whichever Comes First)," originally hosted by BootsnAll.com. It chronicled a trip around the world from October 2003 to March 2005, which encompassed travel through thirty-seven countries in North America, South America, Africa, Europe, and Asia. It was this blog that "started it all," where Erik evolved and honed his style of travel blogging — it starts to come into focus around the time he arrives in Africa.

Praised and recommended by USA Today, RickSteves.com, and readers of BootsnAll and Lonely Planet's Thorn Tree, The Global Trip blog was selected by the editors of PC Magazine for the "Top 100 Sites You Didn't Know You Couldn't Live Without" (in the travel category) in 2005.


Next entry:
I Broke The Bank And All I Got Was This Lousy T-shirt

Previous entry:
Last Licks




THE GLOBAL TRIP GLOSSARY

Confused at some of the jargon that's developed with this blog and its readers over the years? Here's what they mean:

BFFN: acronym for "Best Friend For Now"; a friend made on the road, who will share travel experiences for the time being, only to part ways and lose touch with

The Big Trip: the original sixteen month around-the-world trip that started it all, spanning 37 countries in 5 continents over 503 days (October 2003–March 2005)

NIZ: acronym for "No Internet Zone"; a place where there is little to no Internet access, thus preventing dispatches from being posted.

SBR: acronym for "Silent Blog Reader"; a person who has regularly followed The Global Trip blog for years without ever commenting or making his/her presence known to the rest of the reading community. (Breaking this silence by commenting is encouraged.)

Stupid o'clock: any time of the early morning that you have to wake up to catch a train, bus, plane, or tour. Usually any time before 6 a.m. is automatically “stupid o’clock.”

The Trinidad Show: a nickname of The Global Trip blog, used particularly by travelers that have been written about, who are self-aware that they have become "characters" in a long-running story — like characters in the Jim Carrey movie, The Truman Show.

WHMMR: acronym for "Western Hemisphere Monday Morning Rush"; an unofficial deadline to get new content up by a Monday morning, in time for readers in the western hemisphere (i.e. the majority North American audience) heading back to their computers.

1981ers: people born after 1981. Originally, this was to designate groups of young backpackers fresh out of school, many of which were loud, boorish and/or annoying. However, time has passed and 1981ers have matured and have been quite pleasant to travel with. The term still refers to young annoying backpackers, regardless of year — I guess you could call them "1991ers" in 2013 — young, entitled millennials on the road these days, essentially.




Spelling or grammar error? A picture not loading properly? Help keep this blog as good as it can be by reporting bugs.

The views and opinions written on The Global Trip blog are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the official views and opinions of the any affiliated publications.
All written and photographic content is copyright 2002-2014 by Erik R. Trinidad (unless otherwise noted). "The Global Trip" and "swirl ball" logos are service marks of Erik R. Trinidad.
TheGlobalTrip.com v.3.6 is powered by Expression Engine v2.8.1